Workman’s Mad Science Club 12 Easy, Safe Printable Science Experiments

Headlines have been, yet again, trumpeting statistics about how American children lag behind many countries in math and science skills. With high school seniors performing below the national average for 21 countries, one worries about the fate of the country that gave the world electricity, airplanes, rockets, the internet, and lasers, to name a few.

Save our scientists! Learning about math and science begins at home. You can teach your kids about rocket science by launching a bottle into the air (experiment is in here!), oceanography by removing salt from water (experiment is in here!), and hovercraft technology with a CD or DVD, a balloon, and a plastic bottle cap.

Perfect for science fair projects and keeping little people occupied during breaks from school,Workman’s Mad Science Club presents 12 easy, safe experiments for kids taken from the pages of our books about science. Check out the link to each downloadable experiment below:

  • Experiment 1: “Magic finger” excerpted from Pop Bottle Science by Lynn Brunelle
  • Experiment 2: “Raisin water ballet” excerpted from Pop Bottle Science by Lynn Brunelle
  • Experiment 3: “Chip-ship challenge” excerpted from Potato Chip Science by Allen Kurzweil
  • Experiment 4: “Two-stage rocket” excerpted from Totally Irresponsible Science by Sean Connolly
  • Experiment 5: “How moving!” excerpted from Totally Irresponsible Science by Sean Connolly
  • Experiment 6: “The CD Hovercraft” excerpted from Totally Irresponsible Science by Sean Connolly
  • Experiment 7: “Frankenstein’s hand” excerpted from Totally Irresponsible Science by Sean Connolly
  • Experiment 8: ” Wilbur’s Flying Machine experiment” excerpted from Potentially Catastrophic Science by Sean Connolly
  • Experiment 9: “Barnard’s Heartbeat Experiment” excerpted from Potentially Catastrophic Science by Sean Connolly
  • Experiment 10: “Portable Puke” excerpted from Oh, Yikes!  by Joy Masoff
  • Experiment 11: “X-periments” excerpted from Oh, Yuck! by Joy Masoff
  • Experiment 12: “The Oh, Yuck! Putrid puzzle” excerpted from Oh, Yuck! by Joy Masoff

To go along with these tools for teaching and fun, check out the “OFFICIAL MAD SCIENTIST” diploma !

About Stacie Haight Connerty

Stacie Haight Connerty, a social media consultant, is the Editor's Pick for Most Influential Southern Blogger from Circle of Mom's one of Cision Media's Top 10 Most Influential Mommy Bloggers and one of the HERoic: 10 Mommy Bloggers Who Rule Social Media.

Stacie is the About.com Travel Expert for Vacation Rentals and Shares and a contributor to iBlog Magazine. Stacie founded Social Media Chicks, a collaborative social media consulting company and Georgia Social Media Moms, a group of 350+ social media/blogging experts in her home state.

An Atlanta resident and lifelong writer, Stacie is the mother of three children (11 & under), leader of two Girl Scout troops, an active PTA member and married to the love of her life. She is always planning the next epic travel adventure for her family.

Comments

  1. Thanks will pass it along to my sister! I remember having to think of science experiments in high school

  2. Angie Appoo says:

    cool, thanks for the post, I always try to do supplemental work with my daughter at home in Math and Science, I don’t feel they do an adequate job grabbing her interest in public school. I always hated math and science in school, and I didn’t want my daughter to feel that way, I don’t care if she loves it, I just don’t want her to hate it. Right now, she loves to do experiments, she’s a very-hands on, interactive kid.

  3. Some of these are so much fun, and not only do they fascinate the kids, but often us as well! This is a great way to spend time together (and also throw in a bit of learning) Great post!

  4. Debra P says:

    I think that once a child’s mind is opened to different subjects, the doorway is open for so much more. Who knows what their future may hold. Something they did when they were a child could be the catalyst. I particularly love the Portable Puke! Great ideas here.

  5. this is pretty cool. I know that Scientific American has done some work finding experiments to do at home with your kids, and there’s a new website called Sci Starter that links scientists up with “citizen scientists” and it has loads of projects you can do with your kids.

    It’s nice to see a mom offering up resources like this.

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